February 2011


This next egg dish is kind of scrambled eggs with herbs. It is very good with toasted bread.

Arbolettys

Harleian MS 279, I Volume

Take Milk, Butter and Cheese & boil together, then take eggs & cast thereto, then take Parsley & Sage & hack it small & take powdered Ginger & Galingale & cast thereto, and then serve it forth.

My thoughts:

4 eggs

½ dl fresh chopped parsley

5 or more fresh leaves of sage or 1 teaspoon dried sage

4 tablespoons milk

½ dl grated cheese

½ teaspoon ginger, ½ teaspoon galingale

(salt)

butter

Break the eggs into a bowl and whisk the eggs. Put a small lump of butter to a hot pan. When the butter has melted, add milk and grated cheese. Stir constantly and quickly until the cheese has melted into milk and butter. Be very careful not to burn it! Then add the eggs to the pan. Stir frequently, add chopped parsley and chopped fresh sage (or dried), ginger, galingale and salt to taste. It should be done when the curds of the eggs are almost dry. Garnish with grated cheese. This recipe is for 1-2 people.

Comments:

The book (Take a thousand eggs) says that galingale is related to ginger and it tastes ginger pepper mix. If you don’t have galingale you can add little bit black pepper to the dish and little bit more ginger as substitute. Galingale or galangal root powder is not very easy to find in Finland. It might be found in some online spice shops thou. I found my galangal from Ruohonjuuri shop at city of Turku, Finland.

Salt is not mentioned in translated recipe. So you can leave it if you want. I added little bit, because the dish tastes better with salt.

What a perfect idea is to start this blog with eggs! One might think about after seeing the name of this blog that it will only be the eggs… But this challenge will be more than only eggs in many different ways! I am not sure why the book is called Take a Thousand Eggs or More. But eggs are very commonly used in medieval cooking. Eggs were used for example thickening the sauces and stews. By the way, have you ever seen brown eggs in medieval paintings? I haven’t!

The medieval recipes usually don’t give much information about how much certain ingredients are used in certain dishes. Sometimes the portions of certain ingredients might be huge if the recipe is for bigger households. It is also very common in medieval recipes that it might tell you to put certain amounts of ingredients to the certain food.. and more… if it is good for your Master’s health, or if your Master prefers the dish that way better.. or just more if it makes the food better that way or if you have more to use.

So I have made eggs in three different ways from the book. Two of them are savoury: one with herbs and one with onions. The third one is sort of sweet almond egg pancake.

Cyuele

Laud MS. 553, II Volume

Take almonds, Sugar & salt & payn de mayn & bray them in a mortar/ put thereto eggs, fry in oil or in grease, cast thereon sugar & give it forth.

My thoughts:

2 eggs

1 small piece of white bread without the crust

3  tablespoons grinded almonds

1 tablespoon sugar

½ teaspoon salt

Butter (or olive oil) for frying and sugar for garnish

Grind the white bread with sugar, almonds and salt in mortar. Add eggs to the grinded mixture and mix. Let the dough stand about 10 minutes. Melt the butter in the pan and when the butter is little bit brown add the dough. Lower the heat and let the pancake cook slowly. When the underside is golden brown and top is set, carefully flip the pancake and fold it in half. Garnish it with sugar on top and serve forth. This recipe is for 1 portion.

Comments:

Payn de mayn in translated recipe is also known as payndemayne or pandemayne.. is white bread. Bread was of course one of the most important food stuff in medieval times. It was more often baked at the special bakeries at the town or villages, more than at homes. There are not many recipes about making bread at the medieval recipe collections. The poor people ate more coarse bread than payndemayne, which was the white and appreciated bread in higher societies.